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Posts Tagged ‘cave hunting’

Jeff and I spent the day digging for connecting tunnels around the Wasteland Waterway System.

At the end of a blind valley, where a stream disappears we began our excavation. Digging was mainly by following toward the sound of running water. Several times we bent down and listened for the noise and then that is the direction in which we dug. Being early January, despite the harsh sunlight, the water was very cold. Soon we were covered in a stinking goo of rotting leaves and slimy clay which when dried was very painful to pick free, it had matted like scabs on my arm hair and the only way to free yourself was with a garden hose and a frigid stream of water.

We hacked through clay and leaves and sticks. Finally with a puff of warmer cave air we found ourselves peering through a crevice into a passage underneath, and within there was the sound of running water. Next weekend we’ll break through the cap rock and then we’ll be into virgin tunnel. It looks like the passage is pretty clogged, but I’ll bet it is similar to the main entry, where it starts off tight and grows into something bigger. We can excavate some of the debris and crawling will be easier. This tunnel possibly links with the main Wasteland System, but there’s no guarantee.

See the mess that was our surface dig on youtube here РDigging for Caves in Ontario, and if you want to learn how to find your own caves, or just read about some really extreme explorations beneath Ontario, by divers, cave divers and explorers like myself buy my book,  Caving in Ontario; Exploring Buried Karst, here.

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Beaver Valley, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

I was out scouting for a possible cave dig location today. Caving in Ontario can sometimes involve a little digging. Beaver Valley has a few promising possibilities. Investigations from a past trip revealed the likelihood of a bedding plane tunnel, there was no remarkable amount of solution taking place. Again I was drawn back here. There is too much sinking and all the signs that would suggest that something very active is taking place beneath the surface – huge sinkholes all lined up, elevation, exposed rock (the right kind of rock) and plenty of serious corrosion on the surface.

There has to be more to this place than beautiful colored leaves.

Check this out – it was under the search term of a “sink”, but it’s really a washout, but still worth seeing. I gotta ask myself what the odds of catching this on video was. Here

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Bed of Glass Cave Рa newly discovered Ontario cave


Jeff C.’s picture¬†

So here is where you slip down the incline from beneath all the tangled wire deeper into the cave. Right next to my helmet there is an old milk churn and in sliding over it I bruised my ribs quite badly and I’m still feeling it today. I am looking down a slope that is strewn with broken glass and old bottles and wondering wheter I’ll be getting my belly slashed today. The cave is likely unexplored by people, but it certainly shows signs of their human presence by the trash that has tumbled in over the years. One thought would be to clear the garbage and restore the cave to a relatively pristine state.

This cave kind of reminds me of the XS wired project that I had been involved with, though also something like Olmstead Cave. It seems like farmers viewed sinks and cave openings as the place to dump all their old fencing. Something else that seems to be quite noticeable is that most dismiss the caves as tiny holes around which they played as children – a fox hole, or an overhang. Most know of the cave presences on their land, though most have a fanciful memory of them. Most wont have even seen the actual opening as it would have been buried under trash heaps from as far back as the 1800s. When I got home last night from the cave trip I found an 8 inch long spine of rusting wire threaded into the back of my pants and through my belt. Fortunatly the wire had passed parallel to my backside as opposed to something a little more noticeable.

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