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Archive for the ‘wildlife in Costa Rica’ Category

Edgehill Press has just released their new book, “Tamarindo; Crooked Times in Costa Rica – the author, yours truly.

If you intend to visit Costa Rica this is essential reading, a humorous account of the practices of two drug dealers and a lizard who start a company that offers Vespa tours to surfers in the town of Tamarindo.

See the book here…. Tamarindo; Crooked Times in Costa Rica

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Behave Yourself! – Rockwatching Blogging Protocal

 

scan0001, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

Well, Rockwatching has been up and running for a number of years now (5 to be exact) and I believe it has contributed significantly to the interest of people like myself who like caving, rocks, the outdoors, gems and minerals in Ontario.

We are just a few short days from 2011 and I believe it’s high time we made some resolutions -all of usĀ  (you my loyal fellow bloggers as well).

So in the interests of all involved a few ground rules to follow on Rockwatching from now on

1) Lets not carry a personal vendetta onto this site which is meant to be a forum where like minded enthusiasts can interact in a positive way.
2) Lets respect each other and try not to get personal when we are frustrated.
3) Lets respect the basics of conservation and eco-minded thought.
4) Lets not assume stuff we don’t know for sure (hence the survey at the bottom of the post).
5) Lets keep in mind that this is all about enjoyment.
6) Lets keep in mind that just because the topic is on the table, every single aspect that pertains to it is not an open book.
7) Lets respect people who are not on the site, private property, reputations etc. Just because there is discussion of a site or feature does not mean permission has been granted to go there.

8) Lets not get petty, self righteous or important. Stop correcting my grammar, spelling or use of terms. I am a writer at heart and so I believe I can use the language as I please (providing it’s in good taste, or if I choose, not in good taste).

9) Lets not waste my time by having to re-direct you to one of the above rules.

Happy and prosperous 2011 – Mick

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Real cute little guy – Costa Rica

Costa Rica 3 185, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

A mother and baby howler monkey in what we came to refer to as “the monkey tree”.

One really hot day when Maggie only wanted to relax on the beach I ventured further inland up a dusty road. I reached this tree that must have had about 30 howlers in it. I think it may have been a guanacaste tree that has been enveloped by a strangler fig.

The monkeys just watched me until I got really close and then the males started barking. It was insane. Every monkey within several kilometers took up the cry, you could hear them everywhere. Its quite intimidating.

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I had recently been corresponding with one of this province’s cavers – James Sled, he has told me of a cave that sounds really promising – a pit on a high ridge in prime caving country. The pit is situated in the bottom of a 15 foot wide depression and beneath a river runs along a tunnel that eventually sumps.

Using the patchwork of topo maps that I was able to download from toporama andĀ James’s directions I think I have managed to pinpoint the exact location.

At this time my good caving friend is recovering from an operation. I typically conduct my explorations with him. I am holding off the initial reconnisiance of the pit until he is in better shape – by the sounds of it his wound is supperating and I have suggested he calls a doctor fast – lets hope he does.

One the bright side I have just had my article on “Costa Rica River Travel” accepted by the New Zealand Herald, cant wait to get it in print. I am considering another travel article on the plight of Costa Rica’s howler monkey’s. In the town where we were staying (Tamarindo) they average two a day being electrocuted on the power lines. I think I will discuss that sorry situation in my next post. Mick

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It is not so unusual to see long nosed bats in Costa Rica.

Costa Rica 3 356, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

The bats cluster here under a shaded tree trunk along the edge of the Tempisque River. They arrange themselves in this linear formation to emulate a serpent. When one moves they all move, it gives the impression of a wriggling line – something like a snake on the tree trunk. This fools would-be predators.

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