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Archive for the ‘eco tourism in Costa Rica’ Category

A map of Costa Rica will be confusing in the maze of convoluted roads along the Guanacaste shoreline. Here we are, several world class beaches within about 20 minutes drive. But where to surf in Tamarindo?

A simple map of Costa Rica with some broad destinations plotted relative to each other might sometimes be the way to go. Follow road signs and ask the locals and providing time is not an issue you will get there.

As they say in Costa Rica – Pura Vida!

Check my simple map of Costa Rica here.

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Behave Yourself! – Rockwatching Blogging Protocal

 

scan0001, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

Well, Rockwatching has been up and running for a number of years now (5 to be exact) and I believe it has contributed significantly to the interest of people like myself who like caving, rocks, the outdoors, gems and minerals in Ontario.

We are just a few short days from 2011 and I believe it’s high time we made some resolutions -all of us  (you my loyal fellow bloggers as well).

So in the interests of all involved a few ground rules to follow on Rockwatching from now on

1) Lets not carry a personal vendetta onto this site which is meant to be a forum where like minded enthusiasts can interact in a positive way.
2) Lets respect each other and try not to get personal when we are frustrated.
3) Lets respect the basics of conservation and eco-minded thought.
4) Lets not assume stuff we don’t know for sure (hence the survey at the bottom of the post).
5) Lets keep in mind that this is all about enjoyment.
6) Lets keep in mind that just because the topic is on the table, every single aspect that pertains to it is not an open book.
7) Lets respect people who are not on the site, private property, reputations etc. Just because there is discussion of a site or feature does not mean permission has been granted to go there.

8) Lets not get petty, self righteous or important. Stop correcting my grammar, spelling or use of terms. I am a writer at heart and so I believe I can use the language as I please (providing it’s in good taste, or if I choose, not in good taste).

9) Lets not waste my time by having to re-direct you to one of the above rules.

Happy and prosperous 2011 – Mick

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Real cute little guy – Costa Rica

Costa Rica 3 185, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

A mother and baby howler monkey in what we came to refer to as “the monkey tree”.

One really hot day when Maggie only wanted to relax on the beach I ventured further inland up a dusty road. I reached this tree that must have had about 30 howlers in it. I think it may have been a guanacaste tree that has been enveloped by a strangler fig.

The monkeys just watched me until I got really close and then the males started barking. It was insane. Every monkey within several kilometers took up the cry, you could hear them everywhere. Its quite intimidating.

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Costa Rica 3 068, originally uploaded by Mic2006.

Maggie fans herself with a pamphlet in the heat. We are in the Tamarindo estuary with Meeener as our guide. From the main channel we weave in deeper through the mangrove roots. There are plenty of alligators, sting rays and birds of every variety. We eventually reached a point where the boat could go no further and we sat in silence eating pineapple and watching the wildlife. There is the high pitched shrill of the “chichira” – maybe it means cicada – and the smell of diesel from our boat. It rocks most alarmingly and is made of rotting plywood with a piece of bent rebar as an anchor.

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A Spanish lesson.

Sheltering from the Costa Rican weather

Up until this day, it had only threatened rain – brief sprinklings from a leaden blanket above – lilac flashes in the dry and dusty hills around Tamarindo but today it was different – the sky leaked water as though its belly had been slit – an evisceration that began with a splattering of large warm drops upon the beach soon escalating to a all out downpour the like of which we had never seen. The Costa Rican weather can be stupendous.

Leaving the beach at the initial onset we headed for the tour company – hoping to find our trip to Barra Honda being arranged as promised, but the intensity of the rainfall had us seeking shelter in “The Pelican Bar”. The bar had sucked up all street traffic for some 50 metres circumference. In dripping darkness without power as frequently seemed to be the case- was packed a great many people from the street – cheek to jowl – sweating and waiting. Few were paying customers.

These two fellows in the picture are Carlos from Tamarindo and the other (whose name I cant remember – but who came from Managua – Nicaragua) I recognized Carlos from the beach, he sold cheap porclean pots with Mayan symbols. I cant imagine how they made any money as I never saw anyone buying them.

Every time the thunder struck Carlos cowered and grimaced – gun shy by all apearance – like a war veteran – but Costa Rica is peaceful so maybe a childhood fear. I bought them beer – the cost of which likely would exceed their daily earnings but they were friendly decent people and by the time the rain subsided and the air had cooled we were pretty tipsy. “KEY – AERO” Spanish for “I would like”.

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I had recently been corresponding with one of this province’s cavers – James Sled, he has told me of a cave that sounds really promising – a pit on a high ridge in prime caving country. The pit is situated in the bottom of a 15 foot wide depression and beneath a river runs along a tunnel that eventually sumps.

Using the patchwork of topo maps that I was able to download from toporama and James’s directions I think I have managed to pinpoint the exact location.

At this time my good caving friend is recovering from an operation. I typically conduct my explorations with him. I am holding off the initial reconnisiance of the pit until he is in better shape – by the sounds of it his wound is supperating and I have suggested he calls a doctor fast – lets hope he does.

One the bright side I have just had my article on “Costa Rica River Travel” accepted by the New Zealand Herald, cant wait to get it in print. I am considering another travel article on the plight of Costa Rica’s howler monkey’s. In the town where we were staying (Tamarindo) they average two a day being electrocuted on the power lines. I think I will discuss that sorry situation in my next post. Mick

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